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 Cotton on Iran nuclear negotiations

                                                                           February 24, 2015

Mr. Xxxxxxx
Xxxxxx Street
Monticello, AR 71655

Dear Xxxxx:

Thank you for contacting me about the Iran nuclear negotiations.  It’s good to hear from you, as always.

A nuclear-capable Iran is among the greatest dangers facing the world today. The Obama administration’s nuclear negotiations with Iran were supposed to eliminate Iran’s progression towards a nuclear bomb.  Regrettably, what began as an ill-advised gamble has descended into a dangerous succession of unending concessions, which is why it is time for the Congress to take action.

Our negotiating “partner,” Iran, is not a rational or peaceful actor: Iran is responsible for killing Americans for more than three decades.  Iran has a consistent pattern of exporting terror, destabilizing the Middle East and inciting worldwide Islamic extremism.  In addition, the mullahs’ regime actively supports Bashar al-Assad’s brutal civil war against the Syrian people, and viciously represses the Iranian people.  Iran does all this without a nuclear deterrent, so we can only imagine what the mullahs would do if they obtained nuclear weapons capability.

As a veteran of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, I’m deeply disheartened to see that the U.S. has already given Iran billions of dollars in sanctions relief, as a result of negotiations, to continue their oppressive aggression.  Iran is a lead financier and supplier of terrorist organizations dedicated to destroying coalition forces and our ally Israel. My platoon and I knew firsthand that Iranian-supplied bombs were the one thing our armored vehicles couldn’t withstand.  Thousands of American troops in Afghanistan and Iraq were killed and maimed by lethal roadside bombs furnished by Iran to our enemy combatants.  I was fortunate, but too many others were not.  Congress must act to protect American interests and end the appeasement of the mullahs in Tehran.

A well-functioning republic depends on active citizens to inform their elected representatives of issues of concern and to hold elected officials accountable.  I’m always grateful to hear from my fellow citizens on matters of public policy.  These communications can be both insightful and useful as I work to represent you, and I hope that you will keep me informed of your opinions.

I’m truly honored to serve as your Senator—please know that your interests and affairs have my unceasing attention.  Always feel free to call my office at (202) 224-2353 or visit www.cotton.senate.gov.

Sincerely,

Tom Cotton
United States Senator

 Cotton on the FCC

                                                                           February 13, 2015

Mr. Xxxxxxx
Xxxxxx Street
Monticello, AR 71655

Dear Xxxxx:

Thank you for sharing your concerns about the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) potential reclassification of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and its impact on broadband internet services.  It’s always good to hear from you, as always.

The FCC is currently considering a proposal to reclassify ISPs as common carriers, a distinction stipulated in the Communications Act of 1934.  Under Title II of the Communications Act, ISPs would be prohibited from discriminating in practices, regulations, charges, and services.  This would provide the FCC with the authority to impose rules on broadband internet services presently used to regulate telephone companies.

The U.S. enjoys some degree of net neutrality today, yet the issue is an important topic in the current debate over telecommunications reform.  As you may know, net neutrality or, the Open Internet Order as the FCC calls it, is the principle that ISPs and governments should treat all data on the Internet equally.  In January, the U.S. Court of Appeals dismissed federal rules requiring broadband providers to treat all Internet traffic equally.  The court’s decision held that the FCC exceeded its authority to regulate how broadband internet service providers manage network traffic.

I understand your concerns about some internet service providers’ actions and restrictions on access to online content.  You can be sure that I support a free and open internet. As such, I will continue to monitor this issue as it develops in the coming weeks and months.  However, I believe that more harm could come from intrusive attempts by Washington bureaucrats to manage sectors of our economy—through excessive federal regulation of ISPs, for instance—than from mutual, contractual exchanges between businesses and customers.

I hope you will continue to keep me informed of your opinion.  A well-functioning republic depends on active citizens to inform their elected representatives of issues of concern and to hold elected officials accountable.  I’m always grateful to hear from my fellow citizens on matters of public policy.  These communications can be both insightful and useful as I work to represent you, and I hope that you will contact me by phone or email to inform me of your opinions.

I’m truly honored to serve as your Senator—please know that your interests and affairs have my unceasing attention.  Always feel free to call my office at (202) 224-2353 visit www.cotton.senate.gov

Sincerely,

Tom Cotton
United States Senator